America's North Shore Journal

Supporting the Ninth Amendment

Iraq

Catchpenny wows Balad

Spc. Stephen L. Bray, administrator with the 248th Area Support Medical Company out of Marietta, Ga., and Catchpenny's lead singer Christian Schauf sing together during a free rock concert Sept. 23 at the Morale, Welfare and Recreation east at Joint Base Balad, Iraq. Catchpenny allowed Bray, a Cartersville, Ga., native, on stage to play guitar with the band. Photo by Sgt. Ryan Twist

Christian Schauf, a Minneapolis native, said he can see a difference in the service members after the band’s concerts.

“You see the looks on their faces, and for that minute they forget they were in the middle of the desert and it’s 110 degrees,” said Zachary Schauf, Catchpenny’s singer and keyboard musician and Christian Schauf’s brother.

Iraqis assisted in environmentally friendly programs

With Iraq facing a host of equally important issues, such as the drought, needed transportation improvements and the necessity of importing refined oil products, Williams anticipates that the mission of his office will continue for as long as the American military is in Iraq. The key, as he sees it, is to demonstrate to the Iraqi ministries how environmentally sound practices aid in creating the solutions to Iraq’s many problems.

Removing Barriers to Progress

An Iraqi traffic policeman watches as cars go through a green light at a busy intersection in downtown Kirkuk city, Iraq, May 9. The street lights have been operational for less than a month, but already the lights have helped make the job of controlling traffic easier. The new traffic lights along with barrier removals throughout Kirkuk city were made possible due to increases in security as the city returns to a state of normalcy. Photo by Pfc. Justin Naylor

Traffic lights have been turned on again in a few busy intersections of the city.

“The traffic lights are doing their job,” explained a Kirkuk city resident. “It has been a lot safer driving around.”

“Everyone stops for it,” said 1st Lt. Akmad Hussein, an inspector for the Kirkuk city traffic police. “The people of the city are learning to respect the lights, and we have been giving out tickets to those who do not.”

“The lights definitely make our job a lot easier,” he said.

Center for Women Veterans Hosts ‘Lioness’ Screening

Lioness tells the story of a group of female Army support soldiers who were part of the first program in American history to send women into direct ground combat. Without the same training as their male counterparts but with a commitment to serve as needed, these young women fought in some of the bloodiest counterinsurgency battles of the Iraq war and returned home as part of this country’s first generation of female combat veterans. Lioness makes public, for the first time, their hidden history.

Lioness tells the story of a group of female Army support soldiers who were part of the first program in American history to send women into direct ground combat. Without the same training as their male counterparts but with a commitment to serve as needed, these young women fought in some of the bloodiest counterinsurgency battles of the Iraq war and returned home as part of this country’s first generation of female combat veterans. Lioness makes public, for the first time, their hidden history.

Call Sign – Killer Chick update

Captain Kim N. Campbell with her damaged A-10 Warthog

Campbell also knew she had a second option: eject and allow the plane to crash.

But there were civilians down there, and there was no knowing who would be hit by the burning Warthog.

Moreover, “ejecting in itself over friendly territory is one thing. Now, ejecting over enemy territory and going down over Baghdad, where we were just delivering ordnance on Iraqi Republican Guard, is a totally different story.”

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