America's North Shore Journal

Supporting the Ninth Amendment

Category: Military alternative energy

A lot of dam training

Charles (Chris) Willis, a mechanical trainee in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Hydropower Training Program, operates machinery at the Hartwell Dam, Charles (Chris) Willis, a mechanical trainee in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Hydropower Training Program, operates machinery at the Hartwell Dam, Charles (Chris) Willis, a mechanical trainee in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Hydropower Training Program, operates machinery at the Hartwell Dam, on the Savannah River

“I already had an associate’s degree in mechatronics [a multidisciplinary field that combines electrical, mechanical, telecommunications, control and computer engineering], but I went back for another degree so that I could pursue the Corps’ trainee program,” Willis said. He recently earned a second degree in industrial electronics while working for the Corps

Wind energy at Cape Cod

Air Force Space Command is preparing to install two 1.6 megawatt utility-scale wind turbines at Cape Cod Air Force Station, Mass.

The wind in Cape Cod, Mass., is about to be called into action once again to reduce energy costs and air pollution at the Massachusetts Military Reservation.

Air Force Space Command is preparing to install two 1.6 megawatt utility-scale wind turbines at the station’ s early warning radar site, called PAVE Phased Array Warning System.

The Cape Cod Air Force Station, located at the MMR, has some of the best wind resources on the property, according to the Department of Energy and the Massachusetts Renewable Energy Research Lab.

Army garrison launches renewable energy project

New photovoltaic panels are being installed at U.S. Army Garrison Kaiserslautern, Germany.

It’s the first time the U.S. Army put photovoltaic panels up on such a large scale overseas. On average, the panels will annually generate roughly 2.1 million megawatt hours of electrical energy — enough to power a village of 500 houses, Lindemer said.

“We’re putting so much on the top of these roofs that we will generate about 2,200 kilowatt peak, electrical power,” Lindemer said. “When the sun is fully shining, the panels generate about 950 kilowatts in an hour.”

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